About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CSPAN 16
CSPAN2 7
KGO (ABC) 6
MSNBC 5
MSNBCW 5
KPIX (CBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
CNNW 1
KICU 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WETA 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 62
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
of that power becomes science. if you fall you hurt yourself and you die. the waves are so powerful that the surfers have to be towed by jet skis to catch it to ride one. she fell and was pulled out of the sea unconscious by burle. she survived and he went back in the water. he said it was karma. at the end i asked to catch a wave when everyone else was leaving and picked up one. i think that was the reward. the record is held by garrett mcnamara. earlier he told us how he managed to break the fear barrier. >> everybody has their comfort zones. i won't jump out of a plane, i like riding big waves. >> reporter: mcnamara is waiting for confirmation he broke his own record by riding a 100-foot plus wave in january. challenging the pickbiggest waves in the world isn't a competitive sport. they win when they end the day together on the beach waiting for the next big one. for "cbs this morning," allen pizzey rome. >> there's something i wouldn't want to do. >> finally. >> norah, you're the daredevil, too. would you do that? >> absolutely. >> would you surf on it? >> no
. thanks, mom. >>> whatever happened to americans' love of science? technology writer david pogue is in our toyota green room. he looks at how we can create more ah-ha moments. hi, david. that's ahead on "cbs this morning." >>> this portion of "cbs this morning" sponsored by international delight coffee creamer. delight in the season. discover card. i asked my husband to pay our bill, and he forgot. you have the it card and it's your first time missing a payment, so there's no late fee. really? yep! so is your husband off the hook? no. he went out for milk last week and came back with a puppy. hold it. hold it. hold it. at discover, we treat you like you'd treat you. get the it card with late payment forgiveness. [ male announcer ] playing in the nfl is tough. ♪ ♪ doing it with a cold just not going to happen. ♪ ♪ vicks dayquil powerful non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. ♪ ♪ no matter what city you're playing tomorrow... [ coughs ] [ male announcer ] ...you can't let a cold keep you up tonight. ♪ ♪ vicks nyquil powerful nighttime 6-symptom
poorly made science fiction, a really stiff science fiction film that that sort of it doesn't want to be fun, try to be sort of self important, and it sits in the middle and doesn't steer the needle either which way. it's really bad! > now you have peruzed the list of movies coming out for november in here are your top predictions. it's still made your list? > it still may my list cause i think hunger's games might really probably may grab the no. 1 spot this weekend it has been a very weak weekend. people are under estimating free birds. i mean animated films have done very well the first weekend of november. and if it doesn't do well this weekend on going to blame it on the marketing. i think free birds has four weeks before frozen comes out so has the family audience all to itself. so i think the hunger games are going to drop back a bit. it still the hunger games are going to make some money @ not as much as some are hoping for. now the hunger games though; do you think it will live up to expectations? >that's a good question. it's a new director francis lawrence the director a
. this is not rocket science. we are in an age in which we have testing that works for the medicare program, for the medicaid program, for welfare, for head start. there are lots of government programs, large-scale government programs in which we protect private information. there's no reason why this program doesn't have that kind of protection, and it will have that kind of protection from the assurance of the secretary and from the president. >> thank you so much, donna. thanks for being with us from miami today. >>> and in our first look at a new nbc news wall street journal poll, the full poll will be unveiled tonight, we're seeing just how the botched rollout of healthcare.gov is perceived across the nation. it's a mix of opinions. nearly equal amongst americans believing that there are short-term issues that can be corrected, long-term issues that cannot be fixed, and those who say it's just too soon to make a judgment call. joining me now for our daily fix is chris cillizza. chris, you watch eed hearing. you've taken a look at this poll. we know there's more to come in the poll toni
on weird science. researchers from princeton found that it's a widely-felt human response. participants in an experiment were more willing to shock people they felt envious of. >> so why is this part of our human nature? i would say if you're happy for the misfortune of others, there's probably something wrong with you. the first one is an extreme sense of justice. we like it when we see others get what bethink they deserve. the second is extreme loyalty. we cheer for those we like and we boo those we don't. think about sports fans. some of the most aggressive sports fans experience shodenfreuda. the third reason is extreme competitiveness. especially in the workplace. somebody didn't get the promotion, they didn't get the corner office they really wanted. it's really good for productivity, but it's really bad for morale. >> is the kompl tigs the best way to psych people up? or does it want to make us want other people go down? and when they do, it will probably put a little grin on your face. >> thanks to the internet, there's even a shortcut. we picked the best for this week es editio
kind, that is all occurring at the intersections of markets and sciences. and the united states, the course -- because of his entrepreneurial system, because of what it teaches in the schools, specially universities, because of the ways kids grow up in the system, to look at opportunity, not a problem. to go at the answer, to work out the how to make the path were great, how to reduce the human footprint on the planet -- these are the things that make united states the attractive part of the work to invest in, because you can do it here. 70% of all the dow r&d in united states is done in the united states. right now the united states is unbeatable for that. second, the value added on resources, how is putting its money where its mouth is. we're putting 5 billion dollars against the national gas advantage that was talked about. we are putting thousands of jobs at work. this will create up to 2 million jobs in the next several years. a lot of that will be exporting brains and of course a little bit of iran. >> thank you, andrew. [applause] having heard from these three global busi
criminal justice system in one that uses science base, human approaches to help people change their lives which reduces recidivism and breaking the inter generational to return. we hope to transform the criminal justice system on a national basis and what we are learning is san francisco is going to help many other states in its jurisdiction to find other ways to serve justice and at the same time change lives and reduce recidivism. our counties realignment effort which means that if we have individual treatment plans, we look at the individual and create a case plan based upon his or her needs and not taking a one side approach as we know about the terrible result of the state prison system. the recidivism rate was 78 percent. i'm really happy to report that we have proven that the sky has not fallen since realignment. we have major results and i will share those stats with you. we have certain sanctions which included incarceration but also rewards for positive behavior and there is leaders in san francisco was in terms of a legal approach was -- ensuring that due process rights were un
. >> can science prevent concussions? >> i did my job and just had to sacrifice my brain to do it. >> the final farewell for an american space hero. family, friends and dignitaries will pay their respect to scott carpenter in colorado today. carpenter died on october 10th at the age of 88. the public service will follow a private family funeral. john glenn is scheduled to speak at the memorial service. >>> thousands of people in france are protesting against new taxes. the government has promised increases of $4 billion to reduce the national deficit. >> reporter: several thousand people here in northwest france, they are furious about their so-called ecotax that the president, president hollande, wants to introduce. he's already backtracked slightly. he's going to suspend it for more talks, but the people here want it scrapped all together. they say it will jeopardize their livelihoods. the area has been hit hard recently by factory closures mainly in the food processing business. they say they're being under cut by cheap labor elsewhere in the european union. they're particularl
, newshour science correspondent miles o'brien traveled to the netherlands for one answer. >> reporter: the netherlands. the name says it all. the lowlands. built on a swampy delta. much of the country lies below sea level. american tracey mets is an author and water management expert living in amsterdam. >> you really wonder why people settled here at all. this must have been such an uninhabitable inhospitable place. it's a very soggy delta. >> reporter: that's what these are for: windmills are essentially pumps. >> if the sails turn, the wheel will turn, this will start spinning and turn. >> reporter: a giant ark median screw lifts the water out of the flood plane. peter paul clap wick is a miller near rotterdam. >> in 1450 when they were introduced, this enabled us to live in areas where before we couldn't live. >> reporter: i then, of course, there are the dikes or levees. massive walls usually made of earth built to hold back floodwaters. >> so really that's what the dutch have been doing for a long long time is defending their country from the water and defending also implies the
! hey lady, that's diesel! i know. ♪ ♪ >>> from science fiction of the 1990s to women's rights of the 1890s, here are today's top lines. don't be cheeky. >> conservatives think that liberals are dumb. but liberals think that conservatives are evil. >> in the movie "gattaca," in the not too distant, eugenics is common -- >> that line appears almost verbatim in the wikipedia entry on "got at that". >> plays a primary role. >> dna plays the primary role in determining social class. hey, that's what rand paul said. >> are you going to plagiarize the whole thing for us? do you have any thoughts of your own on this matter? >> vincent freeman is conceived the old fashioned way. >> my name is vincent, vincent anton freeman, and a faith birth or whatever you want to call it. >> genetic discrimination. >> vincent faces genetic discrimination and prejudice, a borrowed ladder. >> in your lifetime, much of your potential, or maybe lack thereof, will be known simply by swabbing the inside of your cheek. >> won't be cheeky. >> imagine a world where there is no interview, they take a swab of y
to hit the pentagon and the domestic programs. >>> today at&t park will be transformed into a science wonderland. more than 30,000 people are expected to flood the field to explore interactive wonders of science and technology. the event will feature a robot zoo, experiments and other activities from people of all ages. it runs from 11:00 until 4:00 and it is free. >>> still ahead on the abc7 saturday morning news, an east bay city installing cameras everywhere to keep track of everyone oing in and out. and taking a live look from so tro tower -- from s to ro tower on this soggy morning, a tiny bit of the san francisco sky lean you can see there. lisa argen will have your to those who've been waiting for health insurance... welcome to covered california. the place to find quality, affordable coverage, and nobody can be denied because of a pre-existing condition. enroll today at coveredca.com. security, butalk to the leader. tyco integrated security. we'll create a solution customized just for you. and you can manage it all right from the palm of your hand. 8:40 on the west coast. you
the infrastructure of the country, to invest in education, invest in some, you know, basic science whether it's biomedical science or other forms of science to create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to borrow, and so this today port impolice tick and an tag niche is fool hardy. you can't say i'm for jobs, jobs, jobs in the american economy to work. at the same time, you strangle it of funding. you know, the whole government shut down by some estimates cost 24 billion dollars in economic activity. people lost jobs, lost paychecks, with respect hired, and we're still reeling from that. >> host: on the subject of the shut down, how do you any the 2014 election will shake out? thanks to the shut down. >> guest: well, communist dog, thank you for writing in. i think right now that there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles get quicker, and quicker, shorter and shorter, and we'll have another government budget and debt ceiling fight in january and february, may happen again coming summer, next fall, before the election, and so i think by and
not be looking like a grandma when you're a mother. - science is making it possible for women to have babies at an older age, even beyond 50. - the guidelines do say that reproductive medicine-- meaning egg donation, primarily-- should not be used to have a woman become pregnant beyond her normal reproductive aging. - for older mothers, there can be medical risk or social stigma. - they have to consider whether they have the energy to go without sleep the way new moms do. - i don't get as much sleep as i'd like, but other than that, it's been pretty darn good. - also, inside e street, the computer that reads your mind. - chris, can you make it go left? - "inside e street" is made possible by... - auto and home insurance from the hartford, more than 200 years of helping to protect what's most important. for information about our program for drivers 50 and over, including how to find an agent, visit hartfordautoinsurance.com. - from the heart of the nation's capital and around the country, you're "inside e street" with lark mccarthy. - the age of first-time motherhood is rising in north americ
the ravages of mother nature. the cost of climate inaction is severe. climate change is an issue of science, it's certainly an issue of public health, and most definitely it's an issue of economics. economic vitality. earlier, the sustainable energy and environmental coalition, which is a number a growing number, 56 to be exact, of democrats in the house, looking to bring about significant policy reforms that speak to the environmental and energy needs of this nation began to provide a laser sharp focus on the cost of climate change to our economy. in 2011 and 2012, there were some 25 extreme weather events that caused at least $1 billion each or more in damages. total estimated damages were approaching $200 billion and cost to taxpayers, $136 billion. the cost to individual taxpayers $1 billion. talled so we know that there is a tremendous impact here that has en realized by the lack of a focus on to climate change and global warming. as we continue to look at recovery, even from irene and in the upstate new york area as we look at the impact of damage that came with superstorm sandy, as w
and science at an early age. i load up my ipad and my phone with educational apps for my girls. we're a mac family. and they know that. app designers know that and mac notes that, android, and they all know it, and that's why they are designing these devices for kids specifically. because they end up stealing their parent's ipads and it's nice to have a device that is boothly colored, that parents can control, and that you can load up with mac games so your kid can get smarter. >> sounds like what they're saying is parents need to be responsible with what they put in their kids' expand we knew that to have these games on an ipad that make you think about math or help you learn to read and have some helper in there along the way, i don't know. seems like a good thing to me, kennedy. >> parents need to be responsible with everything. and the apa is saying kids shouldn't have smartphones and commuters in their berms. >> blah, blah, blah. >> that's common sense you don't need some body telling you about every decision. >> they said the same about the eight track player and the phone, and i elvi
. they are using a new technology called full body cryotherapy which employs ultracold to affect the body. science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> it may look like a sauna but it's actually the reverse. a super cold treatment known as cryotherapy. >> it's an advanced version of an ice pack. the co-owner said the treatment originated in japan in the 1970 for rheumatoid arthritis. clients spend two or three minutes in a cryosauna that takes skin temperatures down to 30 degrees fahrenheit. so cold that they wear protective clothing. >> gloves, socks, underwear and earmuffs. >> like standing outside in the snow with shorts and a tank top on. this woman said it helped her get back to competition after a torn hamstring. and this woman said it allowed her to return to exercise, despite arthritis. >> i'm able to do my water arobics and yoga. >> cold has become a hot topic in sports medicine. some experts now believe lowering an athlete's body immediately after exercise can speed up recover and lessen the pain often associated with exercise. but the biology is complicated and there's debate ov
. science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> it may look like a sauna but it's actually reverse. a super cold treatment known as cryotherapy. the co-owner said the treatment originated in japan in the 1970 for rheumatoid arthritis. you you spend two or three minutes down in this cold sauna. this takes skin temperatures down to 30 degrees fahrenheit. so cold that they wear protective clothing. >> gloves, socks, underwear and earmuffs. >> like standing outside in the snow with shorts and a tank top on. it allowed this woman to return to exercise, despite arthritis. >> i'm able to do my water arobics and yoga. >> cold has become a hot topic in sports medicine. some experts now believe lowering an athletes body immediately after exercise can speed up recover and lessen the pain associated with exercise. but the biology is complicated and there's debate over how different methods of cooling actually effect the body. this physical therapist has worked with the cryotherapy chamber and said he's seen results. >> we really want to get all that inflammatory processing going and get it mov
. they are using a technology called full body therapy which employ he is ultracold to affect the body. science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> it may look like a sauna but it's actually reverse. a super new treatment known at chiro therapy. the co-owner said the treatment originated in japan in the 1970 for rheumatoid arthritis. this takes skin temperatures down to 30 degrees fahrenheit. so cold they wear protective clothing. >> gloves, socks, underwear and earmuffs. >> like standing outside in the snow with shorts and t third on. it allowed this woman to return to exercise, despite arthritis. >> i'm able to do my water arobics and yoga. >> cold has become a hot topic in sports medicine. some believe lowering an athletes body immediately after exercise can speed up recover and lessen the pain associated with exercise. but the biology is complicated and there's debate over how different methods of cooling actually effect the body. this therapist has worked with the chamber and said he's seen results. >> we really want to get all that inflammatory processing going and get it moving
's science. now, you are caught up and clued in on the top of the list. >>7 star wars fans, which is everyone, right? stop everything you're doing. this is galactic. pop culture hotter than life, on the hot list. >>> a youtube user dropped a nerd explosion on the internet yesterday with never-before-scene footage from the original star wars.ájm the guy bought an old laser disk on e-bay and found grkeek gold. two plus minutes of star wars bloopers. our advice? google it soon.v @
that science and engineering is good to do, because they will see it writ large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is a notion of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we are going to dig through the soils of mars and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. chemistry, physics, geology -- planetary geology -- chemical engineers, mechanical engineers, all the stem fields represented in the nasa portfolio. umps that, asa p flywheel that society taps for innovations. >> booktv has aired over 40,000 programs about nonfiction books and authors. booktv, every weekend on c- span2. "washington journal" continues. host: we are back to the last remaining minutes of "washington to go outsideant washington and in your take on whether congress should endorse or stop the nsa spying program. you have seen the papers this morning, that president obama was made aware is past summer about spying on allies, and the head of the intelligence feinstein, said that that is a big problem and she would like to see a total review of
health best itthe very path -- can offer, including the national institute of science, the national institute of health, the center for disease control, everything our public health systems within our state have brought together over these many years, and then do that in combination with the private sector so that we can take the entrepreneurial advantage that the private sector can bring to this remedy, and then take science and technology, most notably the genomic project that is going on that has untold benefits, what the american people want to see is to help them out, to solve their problem, to help them get better health care. end do not want to see this lists, less filling debate from the committee. i challenge the chairman, let's do what we did with tax reform and break down into individual groups and solve this problem together so that we are taking the best of the public sector the best of the private sector, and all of it, innovation, technology, can bring to bear on changing the paradigm for the american citizen. so it is their health and well- being that becomes the foc
the national institute of science, national institute of health, centers for disease control, everything our public health systems in our state has brought together over these many years, and do that in combination with the private sector so that we can take the entrepreneurial advantage that the private sector can bring to this remedy. then that takes science and technology, most notably the genomic project going on with untold benefits. what the american people want to see is to help them out, to solve their problem, to help them get better health care. they don't want to see this endless tastes great/less filling debate from the committee. i challenge the chairman. let's do what we did with tax reform. break down to individual groups and solve this problem together so we are taking the best of the public sector, the best of the private sector, and all that innovation technology can bring to bear on changing the paradigm for the american citizen. so it's their health and well being that becomes the focus, not the ideology of either party. but the health and well-being of the american citiz
money now to rebuild the infrastructure of this country and invest in education, invest in basic science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to borrow. simplisticrty antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i and at the same time you strangle it of funding. down,ole government shut by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: here is a tweet -- thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
museum in jackson, mississippi, and the museum of natural science. george has been featured in many national shows such as southern living. -- e accolades are a test testament. i would like to recognize mr. george berry sr. on his achievements both as an artist and as a teacher. for more than 50 years, george has used his god-given gift as a skillman craftsman to make beautiful pieces of art. today he continues to graciously share his knowledge and skill with many others. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. pursuant to clause 12-a of rule 1, the chair declares the house in recess until noon health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius will appear before a house committee tomorrow. the house energy and commerce committee, that is scheduled for 9:00 a.m. eastern. a couple of other hearings to mention, this afternoon, national intelligence director, health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius will appear before a house committee tomorrow. the house energy and commerce committee, that is
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "hannity" time to reveal what have you chosen for video of the date. jay leno who nbc was dumb enough to fire not once, but twice ripping into the administration's botched rollout. take a look. >> reporting the president has known for three years people would lose their coverage. the press is now saying the president lied. the today the white house says it's not true, he did not lie. here is the tape from three years ago. >> if you like your doctor, you cannot keep your doctor. if you like your private health insurance, you cannot keep it. >> remember the old days? michelle biden? what happens to that? >> why would nbc be dumb enough to do that twice? i don't know. don't forget send us your obama care horror stories. i'm going to read some tomorrow night on the air. thank you for being with us, start your day each weekday morning with fox and friends. we'll see you back here tomorrow night. ♪ ♪ >>> the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> there is no excuse for it. and i take ful
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> time for a "hannity" investigation into the goal of the president's health care overhaul. we have known the president was a proponent of a single payer health care system. we now have video to prove it. was this the intention from the beginning? we want to ask you. is this where america is headed? is this what their design is? watch this. >> i happen to be a proponent of a single payer universal health care plan. >> single payer health care plan. universal health care plan. that's what i would like to see. as all of you know, we may not get there immediately. >> the public option is not your enemy. it is your friend, i believe. let me say -- address an illegitimate concern being put forward by those who are claiming that a public option is somehow a trojan horse for a single payer system. >> so is obama care just a way to transition the country into a single payer system? was that the president's master plan all along? here with reaction her first national television interview li
headlines. >> i learned something new about maria molina. did you know she used to be a science teacher? >> no. >> 7th grade science teacher. >> really? >> anyway, that's your interesting tidbit for the day. got some headlines. did you hear about this? a new york university student who slipped between two buildings in downtown new york city, was missing for 36 hours and he has finally been found. he was lodged between the two buildings, a dorm and also a parking garage. the space was just two feet wide. it took an hour and a half for first responders to reach him. they had to break a wall just to get him out. >> had we not told the security guards, the three of us 19-year-old students to check the roof, they would not have found him for who knows how long and he would probably be dead right now. >> the student was reportedly on his dorm roof building, 17 stories high, and we're told that he was taking part in a fire drill when he slipped between the building. he's hospitalized in serious condition. >>> looks like a scene from the movie, but these incredible images show the aftermath of
've got two life sciences, amgen which has been doing well ever since. another example of a company is life technologies. being bought by thermo fisher, another terrific company and itself a big winner. the acquiring companies have been phenomenally successful this year which is why it's not a surprise to see that constellation brands hit an all-time high. the cramer fave has made all of the difference in the sleepy spirits company that everyone seemed to hate for a long time. medium stocks are represented by comcast, parent company of this network and newscorp. who said that cord cutting was all the rage for cable? who said content is dead? both again defy the conventional wisdom. to me, they're here because of profitability. producing extremely robust growth from cash flow. news corp.'s entrance reminds us how breaking up is hard to do. fox's sister company is up 47% year-to-date. you want a good sign for the country and california in particular? then take heart that sempra energy is on the list. in southern california gas. i knew southern california gas. they tracked me down afte
's a science, government is learning this. most ecommerce start-ups fail, few succeed. we have been fortunate like amazon and ebay. we have bought the the know-how, the science, we can immediately in these states enroll people in a significant way. >> how many customers have i accommodated? could you handle the scale of this? >> we saw 20 million americans come to us last year, interestingly, over half were between the ages of 18 and 34 years of age. >> that is the prime group need to get enrolled. all the focus is on the website not working. the focus soon is going to be on enrollment and having balance in these enrollment pools, otherwise, we will have real pricing issues. that to me is a fundamental issue and a bigger calgary. why not bring the best of the government sector to gather government and make it work. >> mike. >> the rollout has been a mess. let's stipulate that. let's also stipulate that the plan as it was assembled is kind of confusing to a lot of people now. it's only been a couple of weeks. >> true. >> nothing has ever evolved in a couple of weeks of this scope. but you tell
. today in oak ridge, tennessee, the american museum of science and energy and cold war patriots are gathering to celebrate former workers and view a quilt that honors workers safety. this one of a kind remembrance quilt has 1,250 commemorative handwritten quilt squares that form an american flag that measures 17 feet by 11 feet. i want to specifically remember bill wilcox for his service to our country and passion in preserving oak ridge history. bill passed away this summer. he was a former manager of the k-25 operations, a manhattan project veteran and the official historian for the city of oak ridge. in 1943, bill was hired by tennessee eastman on a secret, secret, secret project in an unknown location. when he started at eastman, he was told as chemist, you will have to know that you will be working on this project with a substance called uranium. that's the last time you will hear that word or that you will speak it until after the war. and if you are ever heard speaking the word, you will be subject to discharge from our employment immediately and very likely prosecuted by
science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to orrow. this tea party simplistic antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i am for jobs and at the same time ou strangle it of funding. the whole government shutdown by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: on the subject of the shutdown. communist dog rights -- writes in on twitter -- guest: thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
an unprecedented opportunity, using science and technology, to create a better understanding of landscapes than ever before, to advance important conservation goals and achieve our development objectives together. it's not an either or. it can't be. we're already seeing this approach work. as we seek to meet present obama's goal of uprooting 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy on public lands by 2020. it's a goal towards which my predecessor ken salazar made huge strides. for example, in southern california and we're working with the state on something called the desert renewable energy conservation plan. it's an ambitious plan. in that region, we are going to be blending science and satellite data, identifying the areas of highest energy potential but also high priority conservation lands in the mojave desert. it's interesting because i happened to know two young scientists who both did some of the early work after graduating from school by counting desert tortoises. i do nothing why they're counting desert tortoises until he came to the job and you're doing work on behalf of the usgs and eff
. >> they have jeff science to run it for two months to fix it before the end of the year. i think they need to hire that kind of ceo-type figure and give her that type of responsibility. >> you think? >> this is a long game. everyone is worried about this quarter. this is a long game. >> wait. do we have that clip from "new york" magazine? it's a long game, chuck todd but look at this. >> game started in 2010. >> you can keep your plan if you are swafd it. if you like your plan and you like your doctor, you won't have to do a thing. you keep your plan. if you like your health care plan, you'll be able to keep your health care plan. if you got health insurance you can keep it. if you like your health care plan you can keep it, your plan. if you got health insurance, you like your doctor, you like your plan, you can keep your doctor, you can keep your plan. if you have insurance that you like, then you will be able to keep that insurance. if you like your doctor or health care plan, you can keep it. if you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan. if you like your heal
are investments in infrastructure, education, science, and technology. when you add in the interest of the public debt, two thirds of the budget is medicare, medicaid, and social security. is and where the money that is where we going to make progress in the future. host: we will go to carl in chicago, illinois on our line for democrats. caller: good morning. you are just saying something about a balance between spending and revenue. i think you have it wrong. this is where the problem is. in 2000, we had a balanced budget. republicans chose to take all of the surplus and have tax cuts. they say that we could have a war. they said it would not cost us a dime. it cost us $1 trillion. then we also had the recession. americans lost three percent of their net worth. we lost gdp. this probably comes to maybe about a couple trillion dollars. this is not about the entitlements. not that they cannot be reforms. our principal problem is because we did not raise the taxes to pay for these things. it is not because we were spending too much. you cannot buy a yacht and take six months off of work. those were
talents and interests spanned both art and science. one of his most famous works is the pe trooufian man, wildly held to represent the artist's keen interest in proportion and attempts to relate man to nature. "the figure has two centers, one spiritual, within the circle and is in the naval, and the other physical, located in the genitals and which is in the center of the square." what a mind could conceive such things would make of ""the davinci code"" with its plot riddled with historical factual errors doesn't bear thinking about. but from the box office to the bookstore, blockbusters have generated millions of dollars, money the man himself would no doubt have put to good use in his seemingly endless quest for knowledge. so far, uncovering the latest work has used tools da vinci would have been familiar with -- scalpels and hammers. fully exposing it will require modern technology including lasers, ultrasound scaling and chemicals. given the extent of his intellect and curiosity, one can't help but think that the master would approve. charlie, norah, gayle? >> thank you, but where ha
no player can see. >> so the system is showing real-time impact. >> can science prevent concussions? >> i did my job and just had to sacrifice my brain to do it. >> condition critical, new documents revealing how many people signed up for health insurance in the first days of the troubled website. >> a stunning admission by the u.s., john kerry saying some u.s. surveillance has gone too far, just as some giant tech companies are pushing back against the government. >> the dispute between china and japan growing bigger as both sides ramp up their sabre rattling and the danger of a military conflict. >> i was expecting it not to be so severe. >> a young woman injured in a boat accident has a chance to walk again, thanks to new surgery for spinal victims. >> welcome to aljazeera america, i'm del walters. for more than a month now, the obama administration has been saying that millions of people have visited the affordable care act website. so many they caused the site to crash. officials have been quiet on how many actually enrolled, saying the numbers were not yet available. now there are n
and marine science at the university of south florida, and finally, we'll all remember his work on behalf of sick children and creating a national registry for bone marrow donors. he has left behind a rich legacy that we as members of congress must all aspire to achieve. the chairman was never afraid to reach across the aisle and worked for the greater good. i'm extremely thankful that i was able to express my gratitude to him last week when i visited him at his bedside and i told him how much all of his colleagues loved him and his constituents appreciated all that he did for them. in closing, my father, former sent ssman mike bilirakis to him. dear bill. since we are roughly the same age, remember i'm five months older, so we joked about respecting your elders. we have expected that this day would come for both of us, but first for me and not so soon. we grew up in the same pittsburgh area at the same time, tough depression, poverty, which made us tough. we didn't know each other then, decreed we our lord would meet years later. we worked hard and became successful, the good old america
of the sudden they are out of business. >> it's not rooted in science. congress shouldn't be messing around with things it doesn't understand. >> congress likes to do that remember last week they pretended they understood how the internet worked. coming up on the show, just when you thought obama care couldn't get any worse it, does the ceo of one of the biggest investigation for fraud of the bombshell report you need to hear next. just in the nick of time meet the woman who claims the lottery ticket with just hours to spare. moments really. >> that could happen to you, oh, wait, no. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping ] sounds good. campbell's healthy request. m'm! m'm! good.® i get out a lot... except when it's too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect mfamily. you
tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. but it doesn't usually work that way with health care. with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and cost estimates, so we can make better health decisions. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. >>> all right. let's talk some world series. mike barnacle, thrilled to be up with us at this hour in the central time zone from st. louis. along with senior writer for sports on earth.com and founding editor of sport website dead spin. gentlemen, good morning. >> good morning. >> wow, quick response. >> it was a quick response. >> look how happy they are. >> so, mike, unbelievable endi
stations. you know, from a young age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. >> this morning we open the "world news now" vault to a day millions will never forget. >> it was on this day last year that superstorm sandy hit the east coast wiping out homes, businesses, crippling parts of the region and claiming hundreds of lives. >> surviving hurricane sandy. 50 million people are in the path of this superstorm. forecasters are warning of life-threatening flooding. >> this morning, hurricane sandy is our only story as that monster storm churns into a worst-case scenario. >> 50 million people are in harm's way. many have been heeding the warning. scrambling to get ready. boarding up their houses. buying whatever supplies they can find and fleeing their homes if they have to. >> a lot of coastal communities up and down the coast. people are told to get out. hopefully most folks have heeded those warnings. we are getting to a point where it will be too late to turn
age. i definitely want to major in political science. become the mayor or something. make the situation better for other people. my name is justin, and i am your dividend. >> i ate all of your halloween candy last night. [ crying ] >> i ate it all. ♪ i want candy ♪ i want candy >> a classic clip to set up our next segment. next to christmas, halloween is the best time of the year for kids to get good stuff. good stuff as in piles and piles of candy. >> through the years we all had our favorite. mine was anything chocolate but that nestle $100,000 bar came out. something about $100,000 that sounded cool. that was my favorite? what was yours. >> sugar daddies. no question in my mind. >> look at the boxes we got. >> to honor the annual tradition where scary and sweet come bind courtesy of candywarehouse.com we have a look at the classics. we will start in the '60s. of course, why not. take a look. you said this is your favorite box. >> to me, this is my 1970s, even though it says 1960s. this is stuff i was getting in my bag. dots. the cigars that are chewing gum. sugar da
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)